What is systematics?

Systematics is the study of biological diversity and its origins. It focuses on understanding evolutionary relationships among organisms, species, higher taxa, or other biological entities, such as genes, and the evolution of the properties of taxa including intrinsic traits, ecological interactions, and geographic distributions. An important part of systematics is the development of methods for various aspects of phylogenetic inference and biological nomenclature/classification.

The objective of the Society of Systematic Biologists is the advancement of the science of systematic biology in all its aspects of theory, principles, methodology, and practice, for both living and fossil organisms, with emphasis on areas of common interest to all systematic biologists regardless of individual specialization.

Systematics books at Amazon.com (click for more...)

Books recently reviewed in Systematic Biology, or written by members of the Society.

Issues Online

Recent issues Past issues

Frontiers in Phylogenetics 4th Annual Symposium videos online

The Frontiers in Phylogenetics 4th Annual Symposium entitled "Genome-Scale Phylogenetics: Analyzing the Data” will remain available to watch on Ustream-SI in unedited form in three parts.

Part 1) Opening (Mike Braun, John Kress, Guillermo Orti), Lacey Knowles, Kevin Kocot, Ingo Ebersberger...
Part 2) Ingo Ebersberger continued, Derick Zwickl, Dave Swofford...
Part 3) Dave Swofford continued, Luay Nakleh, Bastien Boussau, round table discussion.

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/Smithsonian-On-UStream-TV

Part 1 http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/52713111
Part 2 http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/52716590
Part 3 http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/52720049

An edited version of the event will be available as a podcast on iTunes at a later date, to be announced.

Martha N. and John C. Moser Chair in Arthropod Biosystematics and Biological Diversity

The Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology (EEOB) and the Department of Entomology of The Ohio State University seek appliants for The Martha N. and John C. Moser Chair in Arthropod Biosystematics and Biological Diversity. We seek a colleague taking a lineage-focused approach to questions in evolution and ecology of terrestrial or freshwater arthropods. We are especially interested in those scientists using novel approaches and those who enhance existing strengths of the departments and the Museum of Biological Diversity in phylogenetic systematics, species discovery and description, biodiversity informatics, population genetics, or evolution of character systems or interspecific interactions. More details at https://eeob.osu.edu/news/search-underway-martha-n-and-john-c-moser-chair-arthropod-biosystematics-and-biological-diversi.

About Women in Science (Evol2014)

Below are the links from the Evol2014 About Women in Science events on the topic of Implicit Bias. For each session, we have provided Joan's presentation and the workshop responses from the attendees. We hope that you find the information useful.

We would like to thank the organizers of Evol2014, the three societies who sponsored these events, our guest speaker, Joan Herbers, and our attendees.

Michele Dudash and Jenny Boughman

Classical determination of monophyly

Systematists with a yen for theory might be
interested in a three-part paper:

Zander, R. H. 2014. Classical determination of monophyly,
exemplified with Didymodon s. lat. (Bryophyta). Parts 1, 2 and 3. Phytoneuron issues 2014-78, 2014-79, and 2014-80.

In which I attempt to formalize (find the statistical and
logical basis) of the heuristics classical taxonomists use to intuit monophyly.

We are apparently good at it but can’t say why. Until now. If I’m right.

These may be found on the Phytoneuron Web site:
http://phytoneuron.net

Genome-scale Phylogenetics: Analyzing the Data

The Washington Area Phylogenetics Consortium is pleased to announce the fourth annual Frontiers in Phylogenetics Symposium!

Genome-Scale Phylogenetics: Analysing the Data

Location: Warner Brothers Theatre, National Museum of American History, Washington, DC

Time and Date: 9 AM to 5 PM, Monday September 15, 2014

REGISTRATION IS FREE BUT REQUIRED. Visit link below to register https://docs.google.com/forms/d/10p7xgDeAFOaVUHhxmQ6-fwf7E9N5lDJYfYf_PokQwmk/viewform?usp=send_form

Postdoctoral Researcher - Insect Systematics at ASU

A postdoctoral position in revisionary insect systematics is available in the Franz Lab (http://taxonbytes.org/), School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University. We seek a candidate with an exceptional record of training and achievement in morphology-based taxonomic revisions of insects and a motivation to integrate their research with developing biodiversity informatics concepts and tools. For additional information please refer to this link: http://taxonbytes.

Researcher in Environmental Bioinformatics, University of Technology Sydney

The Plant Functional Biology and Climate Change Cluster (C3), University of Technology Sydney is looking for someone who can work collaboratively within a diverse team of microbial ecologists, microalgae physiologists, molecular phylogeneticists and plant molecular biologists, as well as in the emerging field of advanced bioproducts from microalgae, in order to build bioinformatics research capacity and to contribute to a range of research projects across the group. Full details here (PDF).